Clothes

What Is A TOG Rating? (Tog Chart Included)

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Knowing how to dress your baby for sleep in different temperatures can be confusing.

Fortunately, there’s a standardized measurement called a TOG which helps you choose the right sleepwear for your baby.

But what TOG rating should your baby sleep in?

Should they wear a body suit or pyjamas underneath?

And should these under garments have short or long sleeves ?

Let’s find out.

What Is A TOG Rating?

TOG ratings help take the guess work out of dressing you baby for sleep.

But what exactly does TOG refer to?

TOG stands for Thermal Overall Grade, and is a standard measurement to indicate how warm or insulated a garment is.

Most manufacturers make sleep sacks and swaddle bags with a TOG rating between 0.2 to 3.5.

The key thing to remember is the higher the TOG rating, the warmer and more insulated it is.

So a low TOG will be more appropriate for summer, while a high TOG will be needed in winter.

TOG Rating Chart

A TOG chart is a quick and easy way to help dress your baby for sleep whatever their room temperature.

The TOG chart below will help you decide which under garments your baby should wear depending on the TOG of their sleep sack and temperature of their room.

(Slumbersac)

What TOG Rating Should My Baby Sleep In?

Deciding what TOG rating you baby should sleep in is straightforward if you follow the TOG rating chart.

75-80 degrees Fahrenheit

If your baby’s room is 75-80 degrees Fahrenheit, you should dress your baby in:

                • 0.5 TOG sleep sack and a sleeveless bodysuit.

70-75 degrees Fahrenheit

If your baby’s room is 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit, you should dress your baby in either:

                • 0.5 TOG sleep sack and a short-sleeve bodysuit.
                • 1.0 TOG sleep sack and a sleeveless bodysuit.

64-70 degrees Fahrenheit

If your baby’s room is 64-70 degrees Fahrenheit, you should dress your baby in either:

                • 1.0 TOG sleep sack and either a short-sleeve bodysuit or pyjamas.
                • 2.5 TOG sleep sack and either a short-sleeve or long-sleeve bodysuit.

59-64 degrees Fahrenheit

If your baby’s room is 59-64 degrees Fahrenheit, you should dress your baby in either:

                • 2.5 TOG sleep sack and a sleeveless bodysuit with pyjamas.
                • 3.5 TOG sleep sack and a long-sleeve bodysuit.

59-64 degrees Fahrenheit

If your baby’s room is below 59 degrees Fahrenheit, you should dress your baby in:

                • 3.5 TOG sleep sack and sleeveless bodysuit and pyjamas.

What TOG Sleep Sack To Use In Spring and Summer?

When the seasons and temperatures change, parents need to make adjustments to ensure their little ones are comfortable and safe when sleeping.

In spring and summer, when the temperature begins to rise you will want to use garments with a low TOG rating, such as 0.5 or 1.0.

What TOG Sleep Sack To Use In Fall & Winter?

In fall and winter, as temperatures begin dropping you should switch over to sleep sacks with a higher TOG rating.

Depending on the temperature of your baby’s room, on very cold nights you may want to dress your baby in a 3.5 TOG sleep sack with pyjamas underneath.

What Should My Baby Wear Under A Sleep Sack?

Parents often wonder what their baby should wear underneath their sleep sack.

We can see from the TOG chart that depending on the room temperature and TOG of the sleep sack, your baby should wear a sleeveless or short sleeved bodysuit in the spring and summer, and pyjamas in the fall and winter.

Remember Every Baby Is Different

You’re probably used to hearing that ever baby is different.

Does your baby get cold easily? Perhaps they find it easy to overheat?

Because some babies naturally run naturally warm while others run cold, it is recommended to use the TOG chart as a starting point and guide, rather than a set of rigid rules.

Parents should always keep in mind that it’s more dangerous for a baby to overheat than be a little too cool.

This is especially important because overheating has been linked to a higher risk of SIDS – Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

By adding or removing layers and shifting up and down the TOG rating, you can help ensure your baby is a safe and comfortable temperature when sleeping.

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